Category Archives: Exercises

A Journey

One of the final exercises in this unit is to photograph a journey that we regularly make. My journey, which I make a little less frequently than I should do, is our regular walk around the block with the dogs. … Continue reading

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The Workshop as Still Life

At the end of my essay on Scott McFarland’s studies of shacks (here) I remarked that the shack, cabin, shed or workshop has been mythologised in recent times, with a changing contemporary nomenclature that has reclassified them as man-caves, hideaways and … Continue reading

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Charlotte Cotton: Something and Nothing (part 2)

When Cotton (1) moves away from still life to look at deserted landscapes she introduces a number of photographers whom I find much easier to understand and relate to. Richard Wentworth’s photographs of the signs and debris of the street are … Continue reading

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Charlotte Cotton: Something and Nothing (part 1)

In The Photograph as Contemporary Art (1) Charlotte Cotton includes a chapter that investigates the strategy of using inanimate objects or environments as a metaphor. In practice this chapter considers contemporary still life photography rather more than human altered landscapes without human … Continue reading

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Fact or Fiction

At the beginning of the fifth and last chapter of the course we are challenged with a series of questions regarding our photographic practice; Do you tend towards fact or fiction? How could you blend your approach? And, Where is … Continue reading

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Rhetoric of the Image

Johnathan Culler (1) suggests that the cultural theorist Roland Barthes (1915 – 1980), outside France at least, has replaced Jean Paul Sartre as the leading French intellectual; whilst soon after his death, The New York Times described him as “one of the high … Continue reading

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A4 Research: Images and Text in the Real World or the Politics of Captions

Clive Scott reminds us that “photography in its entirety is an unstable medium” (1: p.78); a point proven, at least to myself, when considering how the intentions of Dorothea Lange’s photographs have been interpreted and reinterpreted as their textual context has changed over many … Continue reading

Posted in 1 - Captions and Titles, Assignment 4 - Image and Text, Exercises, Research & Reflection | 1 Comment

It’s Not Happening Here But It’s Happening Now – Part 2

In an earlier essay I considered Dawn Woolley’s (1) analysis of the Walker Agency’s 2006 Amnesty International advertising campaign Not Here But Now (here) and was interested to see that she positioned her conclusions in the context of Susan Sontag’s argument, expressed over … Continue reading

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It’s Not Happening Here But It’s Happening Now – Part 1

Dawn Woolley (1) analysed the approach of the Walker Agency’s 2006 Amnesty International advertising campaign and positioned her conclusions in the context of Susan Sontag’s argument that a proliferation of images of suffering has led to our being desensitised. Sontag used the example in 1977 that, because … Continue reading

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The Family Gaze

Photography is inseparable from time. These portraits record the appearance of the subjects at seven discrete moments in time; an eighth fixed moment has been added by bringing them together in a single image and the viewer will establish a … Continue reading

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